Last week, we ran out of flank steak. It's funny how when you run out of something (which is usually always in stock), everyone suddenly looks for it!

One of the calls we received last week was for flank steak because they wanted to slow cook it and make a dish called barbacoa. Since we ran out of flank, I suggested the almighty brisket! The customer was not sure of buying brisket because it would be the first time he would cook it. He was really worried of messing the dish up. So I thought it would be a good idea to break down the barriers of why brisket is truly, remarkable. The customer loved the brisket by the way.

What is brisket?

Simply put, it's a cut from the chest part of cattle, directly under the rib area. A whole brisket is usually separated into 2 parts, the Navel end/Flat Cut and the Point End Brisket.

The 2 cuts of brisket

The point end cut is bigger, leaner and ideal for large gatherings and family get-togethers.

The flat end cut on the other hand is heavily marbled and although more flavorful, it is less desirable to customers.

The Brisket available at our shop is always Point-end Brisket.

Types of brisket

1. Our Angus brisket has marbling 1 to 2. Very beefy and withstands long periods of cooking and heat. Retains its structure throughout the cooking process.

2. Our Wagyu brisket has a high marbling of 6-7 with a thicker fat cap. For slow cooking it would be wise to trim the fat cap. Since this beef has more marbling it is more fall apart tender.

Is the fat from brisket bad for you?

The brisket at La Carne is all Australian and high in oleic acid, which is the same monounsaturated fatty acid found in avocados and table olives. In moderate amounts it is good to have in a balanced diet and lifestyle.

What makes it "remarkable"?

The tough connective tissues in brisket are amazing when slow cooked because they transform into a melt-in-the-mouth, tender experience once broken down.

Pulled Beef Brisket Sandwiches

How could you cook brisket?

Just a few of our ideas would be to:

  • Dry roast (Brine it, dry rub it and roast slowly in the oven)
  • Smoked on a grill (Click here for our fave recipe)
  • Braise (Sear it then cook with a braising liquid in the oven)
  • Toss it in the slowcooker (One of life's greatest creations!)
  • Reverse Sear (using a sous vide machine)

Smoked Brisket

What to look for:

Brisket shouldn't be excessively trimmed and should have a nice layer of fat.

Keep in mind that the brisket will shrink when cooked so allow about 250g per person when deciding the weight you need to buy.

 



Hope this was insightful, happy brisketing!

Meaty regards,
Joan
Culinary Business Manager






Sources:
The Everyday Meat Guide written by Ray Venezia and Chris Peterson, 2016.